At the Adobe Summit last week, Adobe presented our Silicon Designer for AEM as one of the features of their Digital Asset Management (DAM) platform, highlighting the strides they've made in extensibility and Creative Cloud integration. In their presentation entitled, "What's New in Adobe Experience Manager Assets: Top DAM Features," Josh Ramirez and Elliot Sedegah shared 10 recent steps forward for AEM Assets 6.4, one of them being tight integration with Silicon Designer.

This week at the Adobe MAX conference, we at Silicon Publishing are proud to release our first Open Source framework. Called "LotusJS," it's the brainchild of our Software Architect, Dorian Smiley, the culmination of more than three years of focused effort. We're confident that it will be quite useful to many around the world – and we hope to attract a growing community of collaborators who can bring it to even greater heights.

I write blog posts and create an ever-expanding amount of marketing content for our company. I often have to find free stock images, and I am impressed with how good the public domain offerings are getting. Here are the sources that seem to rise to the top.

Things to watch out for

Before getting to the sites, I should note that copyright law is important to follow and there are certainly different forms of "free" license. Public Domain Sherpa and Creative Commons provide great information about license types. Generally speaking, I prefer "free to use, including modification, for commercial use, without attribution" but I consider attribution if that's all that's available. In any case, it’s important to know which license you are using. "CC0" is nice as it doesn't require attribution.

Enough watching out, here are the sites...

I recently participated in a presentation at Dscoop Phoenix with three companies that I've known for over a decade: Pageflex, XMPie, and Marcom Central. We had joined a "Composition Engine Panel Discussion" with web-to-print luminaries Jen Matt (of web2printexperts.com) and Chris Reisz-Hanson.

It was quite an honor to be on this panel, but an even greater honor has been the opportunity to work with these companies' rendition technologies since they first came on the scene. I have been involved in solutions involving all four technologies, and I've met the developers critical to the success of the underlying rendition codebases. These range from: FusionPro, the composition engine under Marcom, which dates from the 1980s; to PageFlex, the PDF rendition library from BitStream also originating in the 1980s; to InDesign, dating from the late 1990s. InDesign is the engine that we and XMPie use - it was created in part by our staff.

Historically, Silicon Publishing has delivered publishing solutions across a gamut of communications channels. In the first place, our Silicon Paginator product (first released in 2005 as the "XML Formatting Engine"), is a platform for flowing data through InDesign templates. As in traditional XML publishing, Paginator generates web, email, print and mobile app output from a single rendition-agnostic content source (or from diverse, orchestrated, content sources).

Multi-channel rendition, connectivity and interfacing are persistent themes in our practice, ever since the late 1990s when "multi-channel" became a buzzword to deer-in-the-headlights printers faced with the need to generalize into "communications" from the too-physical, too-easily-commoditized, craft of print.

I remember a channel called "CD-ROM" and now face channels such as "WebVR", "IoT", and "geolocated social" - the only constant is change.

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