Adobe Desktop Technologies Ascend to the Cloud

Adobe Photoshop is the premiere desktop tool for editing images. It offers the most powerful algorithms for image processing available anywhere, and is loved by creative people around the world. Not only is it ubiquitous in design shops, it is also used by companies (like ourselves) who generate dynamic content with it.

Photoshop is well-exposed to automation: it has actions that are easy for non-developers (yet quite powerful), and it also supports ExtendScript, as well as C++ and CEP (Adobe's Common Extensibility Platform). XMPie is a company that has actually built a product, uImage, that runs Photoshop desktop like a server to produce one-to-one marketing pieces.

Until now, the Photoshop rendition engine has only been available through the desktop application. However, Adobe has just announced the pre-release program for Photoshop as a Service.

How do I keep previous versions of an Adobe CC application as I install the new one?

What is the trick? On install, select "Advanced Options" and uncheck "Remove Previous Versions". That's it! And you'll keep your older versions of InDesign (or Photoshop, or whatever).

How do I get back a previous version of an Adobe CC application that was unintentionally removed?

Adobe has answered this really well here. We hope you don't wind up there, but the bottom line is that earlier versions of Creative Cloud are easily available as needed. It really is quite simple:

Seven years ago, Silicon Publishing stumbled into an opportunity to connect Adobe InDesign to remote assets in a very powerful and efficient way. Through the work of our developers, several of whom were part of the original team that built Adobe InDesign, we were able to make a very direct connection from InDesign to remote assets via URLs. Since that time, InDesign DAM Connectivity has become a significant part of our work.

While other approaches rely on technologies such as WebDAV, which is known for latency and headaches, our direct approach has proven itself to be far more efficient, and is now the way that most leading DAMs handle such connectivity. We have over 25 DAM partnerships so far, with more on the way.

This post talks about 10 of the DAMs we've encountered, which happen to represent a great cross-section of the DAMs out there today. First, I will share an overview of what DAM is, heavily borrowing from the wonderful work of DAM guru Theresa Regli, whose book Digital and Marketing Asset Managment: the Real Story about DAM Technology and Practice is an essential guide for anyone in this space.

Adobe InDesign is the tool of choice for page layout, yet it is a relatively old piece of software, originating in the late 1990s. While InDesign has a concept of "links", its initial approach to graphic references was fundamentally that of desktop software prior to the age of the world wide web. Concepts of linked text in InDesign have evolved slowly over the past 15 years.

A link in InDesign is not, by default, a URL, as one might expect of today's programs. Instead, InDesign links are pointers to assets that are local (on the physical drive of the computer running InDesign) or available across the local network (via a network share). A simple plug-in (our Silicon Connector) can bring InDesign into the modern age, where true URLs enable cloud-based workflows, but we'll get to that later.

Historically, Silicon Publishing has delivered publishing solutions across a gamut of communications channels. In the first place, our Silicon Paginator product (first released in 2005 as the "XML Formatting Engine"), is a platform for flowing data through InDesign templates. As in traditional XML publishing, Paginator generates web, email, print and mobile app output from a single rendition-agnostic content source (or from diverse, orchestrated, content sources).

Multi-channel rendition, connectivity and interfacing are persistent themes in our practice, ever since the late 1990s when "multi-channel" became a buzzword to deer-in-the-headlights printers faced with the need to generalize into "communications" from the too-physical, too-easily-commoditized, craft of print.

I remember a channel called "CD-ROM" and now face channels such as "WebVR", "IoT", and "geolocated social" - the only constant is change.

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